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christiandude
Midshipman

4 Posts

Posted - 21 Feb 2006 :  21:02:46  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
I've been reading on the net on how people believe that psychology is a religion and to believe in psychology means that you are contradicting Christianity. I beg to differ. I believe that psychology, in and of itself, is not evil. How is it different from studying any other discipline or endeavor? It seems to me that if anything is outside of the Bible, people are so quick to blindly dismiss it as something unacceptable, and detrimental to one's faith.

How is the study of human behavior any different that if I were to study a trade like carpentry (only using this because Jesus was a carpenter)? Studying something to learn more about it and to understand the world better isn't evil. It's just like studying physics, or medicine. If nobody discovered gravity yet, and somebody dropped a rock to see it fall to the ground and called the phenomenon 'gravity' to better understand it, then that just adds to his knowledge of how the world works. Are we to conclude that since gravity isn't Biblical then that means we aren't supposed to take in new information? Or, if I discover a drug that has certain curing effects on the human body, and add that to the canon of medical medicine, are we not supposed to use the drug because it isn't Biblical and we should only 'trust God' to heal us? Of course not! Faith without action is dead! If I am sick and I trust God to heal me, it does not mean to do nothing and ignore everything that is "outside the Bible" (in this case, the drug). One should look at this as saying that now that I know (through God making it known to me) that a drug can cure me, I'll take the drug out of faith, and trust God in the process. God gave us the capacity to think for ourselves and to discover the world on our own.

While the original founders in psychology were admittedly unbelievers, such as Sigmund Freud, and their conclusions on psychology were clearly unchristian, I think this is taking psychology, in and of itself as a discipline of study, out of its proper context. This does not make psychology evil. Psychology is simply to study human behaviour. If Sigmund Freud preaches something contradictory to the Bible, then of course, it has to be thrown out, but studying human behaviour isn't evil in and of itself. In other words, Sigmund Freud coming to his non-Christian conclusions doesn't make studying human behaviour evil, it just means he has come to some erroneous conclusions. The theories just have to be refined and made better.

If I study human behaviour, and as a result, can give you sound, practical advice for living out of empirical data, how is that evil? Yes, the Bible gives us rules on Christian living, but I don't believe that we turn a blind eye, and deaf ear to other sources of advice, as long as it is not contradictory to the Bible. People seem to think that trusting psychology means you're not trusting God. Well, if I trust in God to show me the way, then choose to study human behaviour, isn't that faith in action? I am trusting God to guide me in my study to understand human behaviour better, then as a result, I can treat others that have mental illnesses, or provide counsel.

I wrote this mostly to see what other people's opinions are on this issue and because I am quite disconcerted and upset over people taking psychology out of context and portraying it as a religion against Christianity.

kevtherev
Forum Admin

Australia
354 Posts

Posted - 22 Feb 2006 :  21:58:54  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
I am curently talking about this issue with someone and will post here soon - Thanks for posting and welcome to the board christiandude.

Thanks from Kev - Forum and Site Admin
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nick
Commander

Australia
240 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2006 :  13:20:14  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
Hey there Christian dude, I agree with most of what you have said, but from my own experience I have seen that sometimes people put psychology over the word of God. I am not talking about evil godless psychology but sometimes practical psychology can be in direct opposition to the will of God. Let me explain myself. In psychology we are trying to get people to think rationally and behave normally. But in Christianity we are often encouraged to behave irrationally. If you read the Gospels and the Book of Acts there are times when the disciples behaved irrationally. Often times the things God is trying to get us to do are not things that can be described as normal. If we used psychology on the disciples, for example, it would be a different bible. Read Hebrews 11 and try to apply psychology to it. Imagine using psychology on Noah.

"Noah - you know that it has NEVER rained and you are saying that God told you to build a boat in the dessert? You are being totally irrational here and are in need of sedation and counseling."

Or imagine Gideon when he widdled the Army of Israel from 30,000 people down to 300 when he went to fight the Midionites. This is crazy and irresponsible for a person in such a position. Can you see a psychologist hanging with the disciples saying - "Peter, perhaps you need some drugs to overcome the depression you feel." after he denied the lord three times. Or perhaps some psychologist to do some grief counseling for the 11 whose friend Judas betrayed them, their lord, and then committed suicide. Perhaps the 11 could have been through some grief therapy for seeing their lord crucified. Most of Paul’s life was irrational, and he lived dangerously. He said he was often in despair of life, and was in and out of Jail repeatedly. But he was in God's will. Imagine a psychologist’s review of why Moses was not allowed into the Promised Land, or for the stoning of a man who picked up sticks on the Sabbath. There are 100's of examples where psychology could not help at all and would in fact be against God's will. This is because in essence, psychology is human reasoning. God's will must come first. Look at Job, his friends were using a form of Hebrew psychology but God was for Job and not them.

All I am saying is that sometimes (and I would underline sometimes if I could) psychology is merely human reasoning and not God's reasoning. It can be the opposite of faith. Yes while psychology is logical but sometimes God is not in the realm of logic and it can be against God's supernatural nature. Sometimes God says to a person, trust Me and don't believe the doctor, and he does a miracle, but other times God does not and the doctor is used to bring restoration, or sometimes the person dies, or even worse they refuse to see the doctor out of mere presumption and God does not heal them. But as believers we must always seek God's will for everything, THEN human reasoning. This is why I said that sometimes people put psychology over the word of God, because reason says heed to the doctor, reason says don't go and preach in Iran, reason says if you feel down take some drugs etc, but oftentimes this leaves faith on the shelf. I think we need to recognize that God has given us "ALL THINGS that pertain to LIFE and godliness" through His word and Spirit. 2 Pet 1. This of course does not mean that you will get a diploma in science because you read the bible, but when pertaining to life and its issues like having joy, possessing self control, etc these are found in a relationship with God. Sometimes good can be the opposite of best. Sometimes our will is opposite of God's will. Many fears and phobias are dispelled through a relationship with God. The fear of death goes because we are heaven bound; the fear of man goes because we know that what God thinks is more important, the fear of humiliation goes as we humble ourselves, etc... We find self esteem not in outward circumstances, or in everyone liking us, but in what God thinks of us. I think that if we place drugs in the place of God in these circumstances it is wrong.

Anyway just a thought

What think ye?

Nick.

www.waymanmitchell.com www.pottershouse.com
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nick
Commander

Australia
240 Posts

Posted - 26 Feb 2006 :  13:21:03  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
PS good topic. I feel that any topic that causes us to look at the bible is good. It is a very relevant subject.

www.waymanmitchell.com www.pottershouse.com
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nick
Commander

Australia
240 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  10:21:22  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
Psychology and the Evangelical Church

By T.A. McMahon

Nothing in the history of the modern church has induced believers to abandon their faith in the sufficiency of God’s Word like the pseudo-science of psychological counseling. Consider the following: the evangelical church is a primary referral service for counseling psychologists and psychiatrists. Many large churches have licensed psychotherapists on staff. Mission agencies are requiring their missionary candidates to be evaluated and approved by licensed psychological professionals prior to being considered for service. Christian psychologists and counselors are often better known and more respected by evangelicals than preachers and teachers. Who has not heard of psychologist Dr. James Dobson?

Most evangelicals are convinced that psychotherapy is scientific and is necessary to supply what is lacking in the Bible regarding man’s mental, emotional, and behavioral needs. When I use the term, “psychotherapy,” what I am referring to is psychological counseling, clinical psychology, and (non-biological) psychiatry. I may also use the general term “psychology.” I recognize that there are some areas of psychology that are clearly distinct from psychotherapy and may have scientific merit and value, e.g., those fields that study perception, man-machine interface, ergonomics, some educational psychology, and so forth. They are, however, a very small percentage of the entire industry of psychology, which claims to have scientific insights into the mind of man.

So what’s the problem with psychotherapy? According to numerous scientific studies, it rarely works (and then only superficially) and is known to be harmful. From a biblical perspective, it is an antichristian, religious counterfeit. Both conclusions will become quite apparent as we proceed.

Given the significant influence it has had on the church, the psychological way compared to the biblical way should be an issue of critical concern for all those who believe that the Word of God is their authority and that it is completely sufficient for “all things that pertain to life and godliness” (2 Peter 1:3). How do these two ways compare?

They couldn’t be more at odds. The basic theories of psychological counseling are contradictory to what the Bible teaches about the nature of man and God’s solution for his mental, emotional, and behavioral problems. Psychotherapeutic concepts regard humanity as intrinsically good. The Bible says that other than Jesus Christ, man is not good but was born with a sinful nature, “for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23).

Psychological counseling often promotes the belief that problems adversely affecting a person’s mental and emotional welfare are determined by circumstances external to the person, such as parental abuse or environment. The Bible tells us that a man’s evil heart and his sinful choices cause his mental, emotional, and behavioral problems. “For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed evil thoughts, adulteries, fornications, murders, thefts, covetousness, wickedness, deceit, lasciviousness, an evil eye, blasphemy, pride, foolishness: All these evil things come from within, and defile the man” (Mark 7:21-23).

Psychotherapy attempts to improve the self through concepts such as self-love, self-esteem, self-worth, self-image, self-actualization, etc. The Bible teaches that self is humanity’s main problem, not the solution to the ills that plague mankind. And it prophetically identifies the chief solution of psychological counseling, self-love, as the catalyst to a life of depravity. “This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. For men shall be lovers of their own selves... ”(2 Timothy 3:1).

The Bible teaches that reconciliation to God through Jesus Christ is the only way for man to truly remedy his sin-related mental, emotional, and behavioral troubles. “And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he [Jesus Christ] reconciled in the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in [God’s] sight” (Colossians 1:21,?22).

Psychotherapy has shipwrecked the faith of many regarding the sufficiency of the Bible. Because psychologists claim to have insights into the nature of man and also methods for change not found in the Bible, it follows that the Bible cannot be sufficient for counseling or addressing believers mental, emotional, and behavioral needs.

Psychotherapy has sold the church the lie that psychology can be integrated with the Bible. That ought to be scandalous to any thoughtful believer. Since psychology and the Bible are fundamentally in opposition to one another, it should be obvious that there can be no real integration of their teachings. Moreover, if the Bible, the Manufacturer’s handbook, isn’t sufficient to cover all things that pertain to life and godliness, then His created beings must look elsewhere for their mental, emotional, and behavioral welfare. And if they must look elsewhere, then the Bible’s claim to be authoritative, inerrant, and sufficient is also false.

How influential is psychotherapy in the church? It would be rare indeed to find a topical sermon with no supposed insights from psychology. Typical would be Willow Creek church near Chicago, whose influence is national and international through its 10,000-member association of churches. One researcher of church-growth methods who spent a year at Willow Creek observed, “[Pastor Bill] Hybels not only teaches psychological principles but often uses the psychological principles as interpretive guides for his exegesis of Scripture....King David had an identity crisis, the apostle Paul encouraged Timothy to do self-analysis, and Peter had a problem with boundary issues. The point is, psychological principles are regularly built into Hybels’ teaching.” Rick Warren’s record-breaking The Purpose-Driven Life furthers the acceptance of psychology in the church by including such psychobabble as “Samson was co-dependent” and “Gideon’s weakness was low self-esteem and deep insecurities.”

Why this psychologizing of Christianity? Well, primarily because the church has been sold three erroneous ideas:

1) Psychotherapy is a scientific endeavor;

2) Counseling is for professionals only;

3) Christian psychology reconciles science and faith.

Let’s look at each of these. First, psychotherapy is not a scientific endeavor. Martin and Deidre Bobgan report in their book, The End of “Christian Psychology”: “Attempting to evaluate the status of psychology, the American Psychological Association appointed Dr. Sigmund Koch to plan and direct a study which was subsidized by the National Science Foundation. This study involved eighty eminent scholars assessing the facts, theories, and methods of psychology. The results of this extensive endeavor were published in a seven-volume series entitled Psychology: A Study of a Science.” Dr. Koch sums up the panel’s findings in these words: “I think it is by this time utterly and finally clear that psychology cannot be a coherent science.”

Dr. Karl Popper, regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of science, after a thorough study of psychotherapy, declared: “though posing as sciences [psychotherapy] had in fact more in common with primitive myths than with science [and] resembled astrology rather than astronomy.’’

Secondly, counseling is not for professionals only. Psychotherapy, thanks to Freud and some others with medical backgrounds, has terms and concepts that falsely give the impression that they have to do with medical science. An understanding of the term “illness” is key to seeing through this mirage.

Can one’s mental process—that is, his thinking or behavior—literally be ill? Our brains, which are physical, can certainly be, but our minds, which are nonphysical, can’t be ill. So the term “mental illness” is a misnomer—a myth. Furthermore, with exceptions in the area of psychiatry, psychotherapists do not address the organic or physical problems of their clients.

So, what do psychotherapists do? Well, mostly they talk and listen. Research psychiatrist Dr. Thomas Szasz spells it out for us: “In plain language, what do patient and psychotherapist actually do? They speak and listen to each other. What do they speak about? Narrowly put, the patient speaks about himself, and the therapist speaks about the patient....Each tries to move the other to see or do things in a certain way.”

I assume that most evangelicals, whether in the pulpit or pew, can certainly handle the medium of counseling—which is simply talking and listening! But, few of us are trained professionals. We don’t have an advanced degree in talking and listening, nor have we studied theories about human behavior, which are nothing more than the opinions and speculations of godless men. Furthermore, there are more than 500 different (often contradictory and sometimes utterly bizarre) psychotherapeutic systems and thousands of methods and techniques.

So, as nonprofessionals, we missed out on all of that knowledge-so-called. But still, aren’t professionals more effective than nonprofessionals in helping people with their problems? No!

After reviewing the research comparing trained and untrained psychological counselors, researchers Truax and Mitchell report: “There is no evidence that the usual traditional graduate training program has any positive value in producing therapists who are more helpful than nonprofessionals.”

Consider the conclusion of a lengthy research project conducted by Dr. Joseph Durlak:

Overall, outcome results in comparative studies have favored nonprofessionals.... There were no significant differences among helpers in 28 investigations, but nonprofessionals were significantly more effective than professionals in 12 studies.

The provocative conclusion from these comparative investigations is that professionals do not possess demonstrably superior therapeutic skills, compared with nonprofessionals. Moreover, professional mental health education, training, and experience are not necessary prerequisites for an effective helping person.

Best-selling author, psychologist Dr. Bernie Zilbergeld, writes in his book, The Shrinking of America: Myths of Psychological Change: “...most problems faced by people would be better solved by talking to friends, spouses, relatives or anyone else who appears to be doing well what you believe you’re doing poorly....If I personally had a relationship problem and I couldn’t work it out with my partner, I wouldn’t go and see a shrink. I would look around me for the kind of relationship I admire....That’s who I would go to. I want somebody who’s showing by his life that he can do it.”

Now that’s just good commonsense advice from a man who understands the field of psychotherapy. Yet, in this “perilous time” for the church, many (and the numbers continue to grow) have abandoned not only “common sense,” but worse yet, they have discarded their biblical mandate, which is to minister to one another through the Word of God and in the power of the Holy Spirit. They’ve been intimidated by myths and have turned from the truth.

Finally, Christian psychology cannot reconcile science and faith. Why not? Because psychology is not a science, nor can it be Christianized. Of course, there are Christians who are licensed professional psychotherapists, but there is no recognized branch or stream of psychology identified as Christian.

Consider this statement representing the view of the Christian Association for Psychological Studies:

We are often asked if we are “Christian psychologists”...We are Christians who are psychologists but at the present time there is no acceptable Christian psychology that is markedly different from non-Christian psychology. It is difficult to imply that we function in a manner that is fundamentally distinct from our non-Christian colleagues...as yet there is not an acceptable theory, mode of research or treatment methodology that is distinctly Christian.

How then do licensed psychotherapists who are Christians function? They selectively draw from the concepts learned during their secular education and training and attempt to integrate them into their Christian belief system. Yet, the concepts are all antithetical to the biblical way of ministering to a believer’s problems related to overcoming sin and living a life that is fruitful, productive, and pleasing to the Lord.

You have to wonder why a Christian would turn to any of these wisdom-of-men approaches that were conceived by people who were so obviously anti-Christian. Freud considered religion an illusion and was known to have a hatred for Christianity because of what he believed to be its anti-Semitic teachings. Others, such as Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers, were blatant New Agers and occultists. Yet, consider this quote from a leading Christian psychologist: “Under the influence of humanistic psychologists like Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow, many of us Christians have begun to see our need for self-love and self-esteem. This is a good and necessary focus.” Not according to the Scriptures!

The Book of Nehemiah gives us a picture of what’s happening in the church. Nehemiah (his name means “Jehovah is our comforter”) is a type of the Holy Spirit. God sends him to rebuild and strengthen Jerusalem. Under the guise of helping Nehemiah, enemies of Israel attempt to subvert the restoration. Incredibly, the priest gives one such adversary, Tobiah, a room within the Temple. So it is with so-called Christian psychology today.

How serious is this psychologizing of the church? Although devastating even now, Scripture tells us it will far exceed what we can imagine. The Apostle Paul is emphatic in his warning (2 Timothy 3:1-5) that “in the last days” man’s condition will be “perilous.” That warning begins with a characteristic that is the cornerstone of humanistic psychology and which Paul indicates (verses 2-5) is the source of a host of evils: self-love. Next month, we will consider the prophetic aspects of psychology and Christian psychology as they contribute to the formation of the apostate church and the religion of the Antichrist.

This article can be viewed at

http://thebereancall.org/Newsletters/2006+Newsletters/137518.aspx

www.waymanmitchell.com www.pottershouse.com
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nick
Commander

Australia
240 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  14:45:39  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
I found this link:

http://www.psychoheresy-aware.org/

www.waymanmitchell.com www.pottershouse.com
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christiandude
Midshipman

4 Posts

Posted - 05 Mar 2006 :  18:34:25  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
Hey nick,

I appreciate your response and do agree with some aspects of it. I believe in the Bible teaching humbleness and that we should be cautious about being prideful, forgetting God in the process, that current psychology does not explicitly preach, and things like that.

First off, TA McMahon has a master's degree in communications. I consider his view a layman's view at best. He opposes psychotherapy's view and says that mental, emotional and behavioural problems shouldn't be attributed to parental abuse and environment, but solely to a man's choices, using verses from Mark to back him up. I don't know about you nick, but this seems to be a very narrow-sighted view. If you were born in a family of a certain religion, whether it be Christians, Hindus or Muslims, are you to doubt that you most likely will adopt those beliefs? Or if your parents are drug addicts, is he saying that that has no effect whatsoever? I think even you would agree that that would be an ignorant standpoint. Environment and parental abuse does affect how people will behave, but that is not to deny that we have choice, it just dictates likely outcomes.

He also says: "Psychotherapy attempts to improve the self through concepts such as self-love, self-esteem, self-worth, self-image, self-actualization" and uses 2 Timothy 3 to back himself up. Well, Jesus said that we are to "Love our neighbours, as we love ourselves". Well, it clearly says that we in fact already are supposed to love ourselves. Some people do not, however. I think we've all met people who are negative, pessimistic, have no confidence in their abilities, are needy, etc. So, basically, those who do not, i.e. have low self-esteem, are those who believe in lies because through God's eyes, we are worth something. 2 Timothy 3 is referring to pride when it says "lovers of themselves", that is a sense of good feeling about our accomplishments without acknowledgement that it is God who gave us our abilities.

As for self-actualization, Jesus Himself was a self-actualized individual. He did things that at first glance was "against the Word of God" by the Pharisees. Healing on the Sabbath, using Beelzebul to drive out demons, eating certain foods that are against the Law. Well, he basically rebutted saying that isn't the Sabbath the perfect day for healing?, how can Satan drive out Satan?, and it is the condition of one's heart that is important to God, not the following of menial rules for the sake of appearances.

Also, while psychotherapy isn't for everyone, it does work. Read http://www.hrobbinsphd.com/psychotherapy_questions.html . He says that "mental illness" is a misnomer giving the argument that the brain is physical. I think he's just getting a bit too technical here. Anyone who has schizophrenia or obssessive-compulsive disorder is perceived to have a "mental illness" because their illness simply has no outward appearance of physical symptoms, e.g. rashes, lumps, coughing, etc. It seems to be, for lack of a better term, originating from the mind. That's all it's trying to say by saying "mental".

Can you imagine someone going to operate on somebody in the ER and saying, "OK, I'm going to ignore the last 50 years of medical research but it's OK, I brought my Bible with me." Or "OK, you have a mental illness, so I'm going to ignore the last 50 years of psychological research, but it's OK, I brought my Bible with me." So, in saying that, I do agree that it would be absurd to say that counseling should be exclusively done by professionals, non-professionals can help as well. But you cannot deny that people who put the effort in to study how the mind works can probably help in areas where a layman would not know anything about when it comes to counseling people.

Lastly, my argument was about studying psychology IN AND OF ITSELF. And I did say that anything in the current canon of psychology contradicting the Bible should be thrown out! Psychology is a young science that started in the 1800s. Give it time! Remember, the greatest scientific minds at some point in time believed that the Earth was the centre of the Universe, the Earth was flat and that the sun revolved around the Earth (in fact the person that first suggested to the Church that the Earth revolved around the sun was accused of heresy, much like psychology is now). Today, we know better and probably don't give much thought in thinking, "is the Earth round?" or do we give much thought to where this information originated. Today, most people would say, "of course it is stupid!". Well, at one point in time, saying that would mean you were crazy. Basically, if the current theories are non-Biblical, it does not make THE PURSUIT of psychology evil. It makes the current knowledge evil.

The nature of science has people constantly disproving, modifying and changing theories; that is the nature of the beast. If I intend to disprove Freud, I am still a psychologist, aren't I? I think we are confusing buying into current psychology, and the pursuit of psychology.

In saying that, some practical advice is useful. If I told you to believe in yourself more because research does prove that people who believe in themselves are likely to do better in school, well, I think I just helped someone out right there. For instance, there was an experiment where students who were labeled smart and were given special treatment did perform better on a test than their negatively labeled control group, simply because they believed they had the capability to do it. I don't need to flip through the pages of the Bible to see if this is true or not. The research says so. So, it does not intrinsically mean we are contradicting the Bible.

Point is, while I do think you have good points, I just don't think it has refuted my argument.





Edited by - christiandude on 22 Mar 2006 19:52:33
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kevtherev
Forum Admin

Australia
354 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  17:19:04  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
CristianDude you can actually edit your own posts and fix up any thing you noticed that was wrong or miss-spelt. You can even delete your own post.

On another note: Nick is actually on his way to conference and will probably be out of the forums for a week and half. If any one else has a comment on this issue No matter how small - please comment.

Thanks again ChristianDude for bringing up this issue and posting here at www.forumsau.com

Thanks from Kev - Forum and Site Admin
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nick
Commander

Australia
240 Posts

Posted - 09 Mar 2006 :  16:18:36  Show Profile  Email Poster  Reply with Quote
I am still alive and kicking Kev. I will be going on Sunday @ 6:00. I just browsed through your post dude and will respond later, but you have made some valid points. It is a good topic.

www.waymanmitchell.com www.pottershouse.com
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liberater
Sub Lieutenant

United Kingdom
19 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2008 :  16:03:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by christiandude

I've been reading on the net on how people believe that psychology is a religion and to believe in psychology means that you are contradicting Christianity. I beg to differ. I believe that psychology, in and of itself, is not evil. How is it different from studying any other discipline or endeavor? It seems to me that if anything is outside of the Bible, people are so quick to blindly dismiss it as something unacceptable, and detrimental to one's faith.

How is the study of human behavior any different that if I were to study a trade like carpentry (only using this because Jesus was a carpenter)? Studying something to learn more about it and to understand the world better isn't evil. It's just like studying physics, or medicine. If nobody discovered gravity yet, and somebody dropped a rock to see it fall to the ground and called the phenomenon 'gravity' to better understand it, then that just adds to his knowledge of how the world works. Are we to conclude that since gravity isn't Biblical then that means we aren't supposed to take in new information? Or, if I discover a drug that has certain curing effects on the human body, and add that to the canon of medical medicine, are we not supposed to use the drug because it isn't Biblical and we should only 'trust God' to heal us? Of course not! Faith without action is dead! If I am sick and I trust God to heal me, it does not mean to do nothing and ignore everything that is "outside the Bible" (in this case, the drug). One should look at this as saying that now that I know (through God making it known to me) that a drug can cure me, I'll take the drug out of faith, and trust God in the process. God gave us the capacity to think for ourselves and to discover the world on our own.

While the original founders in psychology were admittedly unbelievers, such as Sigmund Freud, and their conclusions on psychology were clearly unchristian, I think this is taking psychology, in and of itself as a discipline of study, out of its proper context. This does not make psychology evil. Psychology is simply to study human behaviour. If Sigmund Freud preaches something contradictory to the Bible, then of course, it has to be thrown out, but studying human behaviour isn't evil in and of itself. In other words, Sigmund Freud coming to his non-Christian conclusions doesn't make studying human behaviour evil, it just means he has come to some erroneous conclusions. The theories just have to be refined and made better.

If I study human behaviour, and as a result, can give you sound, practical advice for living out of empirical data, how is that evil? Yes, the Bible gives us rules on Christian living, but I don't believe that we turn a blind eye, and deaf ear to other sources of advice, as long as it is not contradictory to the Bible. People seem to think that trusting psychology means you're not trusting God. Well, if I trust in God to show me the way, then choose to study human behaviour, isn't that faith in action? I am trusting God to guide me in my study to understand human behaviour better, then as a result, I can treat others that have mental illnesses, or provide counsel.

I wrote this mostly to see what other people's opinions are on this issue and because I am quite disconcerted and upset over people taking psychology out of context and portraying it as a religion against Christianity.




phychology deals with the mind and attatudes of people,
Christianity deals with Spirit, Soul[That is Mind Will ans Emotions] and the body. I believe that the word of God covers every part of people. Jesus said, "The truth will set you free".
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